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20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 129 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on individuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and in sufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- success convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema often got in the
hurricane katrina under george w. bush, it was an absolute disaster because the guys don't believe in government. so when you put them in charge of government, they do a horrible job. that shouldn't be surprising. now, romney and ryan say oh, no, it's okay. even if we're going to cut it by 40%, a romney-ryan administration will always ensure that disaster funding is there for those in need. period. now, isn't that great? that's just basically the same old romney-ryan lie. i'm going to cut it by 40% but it will be exactly the same. no it won't! you'll cut it by 40%. it will be a disaster, literally! and then we turn to noaa's analysis in 2011 of what the cuts would do. they say without data from the satellite closest to the end of its shelf life, the accuracy of its forecasts for major storms like blizzards and hurricanes would be decreased by approximately 50%. and that's not just hey i can't tell what the weather's going to be like or i can't exactly tell where the storm's going to hit. it has ramifications.
-team" and the damage from the storm, unprecedented. the total cost exceed that of katrina? liz macdonald joins us for a live report and also to assess what is likely in store for investors on wall street tomorrow as well. much more straight ahead. stay with us. ♪ [ male announcer ] do you have the legal protection you need? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy withtep-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any quesons. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. ♪ lou: well, what was once hurricane sandy continues to weaken tonight as the system makes it strike across pennsylvania into southern canada, the worst of sa
, unprecedented. the total cost exceed that of katrina? liz macdonald joins us for a live report and also to assess what is likely in store for investors on wall street tomorrow as well. much more straight ahead. stay with us. ♪ ♪ lou: well, what was once hurricane sandy continues to weaken tonight as the system makes it strike across pennsylvania into southern canada, the worst of sandy's winds are over as the -- what is now called the super storm heads, but windy conditions will continue over the great lakes into tomorrow. forecasters saying the higher elevations of northern west virginia could also get as much as 8 inches of additional snow overnight. well, the trail of destruction, as we reported to you at the outset, leaving at least 39 people dead in this country. more than 8 million customers are without power on the east coast and the economic effects will not be known for some time. joining us now to assess the impact that this circuit will have on the economy, we are joined by fox news editor liz macdonald. let's start with just the straightforward. i mean, the markets close
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the thin
this firsthand, i went down to help out with katrina thing in september. it's weird. because you are dealing with people that lost everything and it's kind of hard to imagine that if you haven't done it yourself. basically, you know, she's looking at her curtains here, she probably hand-stitched those things. maybe they have been hanging there the last 5 or 6 years. everything in the house is wrecked, photos, keepsakes, it's a tough thing. and people deal with this kind of stress in different ways. we as disaster workers, we see it all the time. but we have a word we use, professional. we try to be professional around people that have suffered a loss like this because they don't want us to come -- you don't want to go into somebody's house and be joking and having a good time. it's unprofessional. when you are dealing with somebody who has a loss like this, just think of the word professional. that's what we try to do. this sort of body language here, she's trying to comfort here, do you think she's buying it? not with that body language. she's not really buying it. some people won't. some p
in and that mindset of dissolving governme government, then when you have katrina and you have the storm we get the kind of response we got then and a lot of people suffering and basically on our own. that is the scary part. all back to the fact that it will get worse and worse over time and more and more heated that you have heard the thought that it is time to act and do something and you can't count on government to save you. i live in new york and they could not help many people. 60 houses burned to the ground because how could you respond in three feet of water? host: are you referring it the fires in brooklyn? >> yes, breezy point. it is too much to be responded to by too few resources and there is no power, there is no pumps. it is just crazy. you say how much trust can you have in government? whether can government do to the extent that you have places inundated. you get the point. if it dealt with in a serious way which neither party is doing, it is a joke. they are a small group of voices who argue to muddy the water when it is clearly in favor of something is going on and you need to
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
katrina and during the hurricane. and that's going to be the big angle, i think. otherwise we all guess as to how it affects turnout for elections. and that can go either way. >> you know, dana, it seems as if the white house by the president going back this morning before doing that event in orlando, it's an acknowledgment of they made a mistake going down last night. it seemed like a good idea probably friday when they decided to do that, get down a little bit early, maybe they get something in, and then now wait a minute, woke up this morning, what are we doing here? >> it's one of those things, chuck, when you get to the moment of the crisis, it's obvious what you need to do. when you're planning ahead, the campaign people obviously want to squeeze one more event in before they know he has to come back to washington. it was a mistake. it's probably not going to hurt him in any significant way. it reinforces what clarence said, that the focus will be for the next several days on the president much more than governor romney. >> kim, governor romney does not have a full-time job right
it was katrina or other events we've actually been able to bring in national guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfer that to an air to air victor
't know what he shot about. he hot his mouth about katrina and we have seen record low levels. andrew cuomo linked climate change to sandy yesterday. >> steve: a county plans to move forward with a gun tax. under the plan will be a $25 tax on the fire arms and a plan to tax bullets. but the board dropped that because it would be more than the costs of ammunition. >> giant tiger shark. maria, a black belt was swimming in maui. and the shark confronted her and she gave it a best punch in the nose. she got more than a hundred stitchos her hand and thigh. >> steve: that's what you are supposed to do. >> gretchen: a woman was told her bible shirt was offensive. they made her cover tup with a jacket. they say it violates election laws and the attorney said he wants an apology or there will be a lawsuit. >> steve: is the on the ballot there? >> that shirt is permissible. keep the shirt on. >> steve: 20 minutes before the top of the hour. navy seals outraged over what happened in benghazi posted this on facebook. but facebook took it down. doesn't that vialate people's use of free speech. the
oceanic and not mr. association, the costliest storms to hit katrina by one at funk shot. take, about 30 billion. andrew in 90 to about 36.5 billion. wilma in 2005, i've been 18 billion, charlie indo for 15 billion, reader, frances and jeanne all and hurricane damage. in your view, does the national flood insurance program currently structured work? >> i think it does work. it does help protect consumers from an uninsurable event in the private arcade. the program was created in 1968 was the result created because the private market could not accurately and in suitably underrate the insurance risk. so what was happening was people were completely without flood insurance protection. so is happening in the 60s and 50s as american citizens were being flooded and the only recourse that she had was federal disaster assistance after the fact. so the program was created to have people pay into a program and be prepared for storm and a flood event before it happened. now, it certainly could use improvement. you know, there are critics out there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal gove
and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
here. the same group that went to the gulf coast following hurricane katrina. the navy is bringing in pumps that they normally use on ships. i want it draw attention to the building behind me. it is staten island ferry entrance. currently all services are suspended indefinitely. the police tape is up by the battery park underpass. because as you can see 50 feet of water is still there. limited subway service began before 6:00 today. mta says 5.5 million people daily right on their subways. they also say any day that their trains are not running it costs them $18 million in revenue. traffic has been a mess throughout the city because of lack of people not being able to use public transportation and road closures. they're making three occupants or more are in each vehicle if they're going over the four east river bridges. they won't get a ticket but they won't let people through if they don't have three people in there. also the area around where the crane collapsed in midtown is still frozen. we heard from the mayor bloomberg and he is saying that that is going to be weekend before
fall-out from hurricane katrina sandy. be safe. if you are in the past, midwest, be careful. lock it down. ♪ ♪ >> bret: monster storm sandy leaves 40 dead. millions without power. or transportation. the two presidential campaigns in limbo. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> bret: good evening. i'm bret baier. this time, the hype was justified. what was billed as the biggest storm to ever hit the atlantic coast delivered a crippling blow to the northeast. the entire region nearly half the states in the country were affected in some way. new jersey governor chris christie called it "de stating."devastating." beyond anything he thought he'd see. this is as the presidential campaign begin the final week. rick leventhal is on point pleasant beach. good evening, rick. >> reporter: this storm left 8.2 million homes in the dark tonight. including more than 2 million in new jersey and this entire community of point pleasant beach. the destruction here, up and down the new jersey coastline is de stating. the recovery is only just beginning. >> the level of devastation at the jersey sh
government has stepped in to help. this is the third hurricane i've covered in my lifetime, andrew, katrina and now this. we are at the point where the population gets furious and they turn on the government. the government can just not handle the huge, huge logistical requirements that happen after a storm like this. could this actually turn on the president at some point here? >> reporter: i don't think so. i think what the president has had the opportunity to do is show americans that he was involved in an effort that the country was rallying behind and do his job in a way that got praise by the keynote speaker at the republican convention, chris christie, very tough critic of the president otherwise. so i don't think many voters are going to blame president obama for what's going on right now, and leave aside the fact that the states in which the difficulties are occurring db new york, new jersey, connecticut are all reliantly democratic states. what is much more important to the outcome of this election, michelle, is what's going on behind me at this afl-cio phone bank where union volu
to rescue more than 300 people in the aftermath of hurricane katrina. >> thank you very much. travelers are really struggling trying to figure out how to get home now that hurricane sandy caused many flights to be cancelled. david louie joins us with that part of the story. >> there is no question vacationers had difficulty getting back to the east coast but some people missed plane connection goesing to europe. cancellation of 150 flights here today have left a lot of people scrambling to trying alternative ways to get to the east coast. a number of airlines set up special counters to handle rebookings. some found they had to come up with their own. this family's return flight was cancelled yesterday. >> only way we can figure out how to get home before wednesday was to fly to st. louis, through denver with a three hour ler then drive chusetts, 22 hours. >> that is a nightmare its a mess, a mess. but you know i just hope we're driving. >> some resident couldn't reach her airline by phone. >> i stayed on the phone 20 minutes. nobody answered. just rings and rings then you're on hold. >>
hurricane katrina. the estimates are between $30 and $50 billion. that includes economic losses, property damage and lost business. 90 people are known to have died in the storm. that number could go up. 4.5million people in 12 states are still without power tonight. cbs 5 reporter sharon chin has more now. >> reporter: some of the subway lines are rolling again. many people are finding recovery slow. they're out of gas, out of food, and out of patience. tensions flair on the road to new york city. traffic jams and gas lines stretched for miles in a commute of chaos. >> get in front of me. >> reporter: some stations ran out of fuel or power for pumps. triple a says only a third of the stations are open in new jersey and long island. some bridges opened up but police are enforcing a three person car pool to ease congestion. and more lines swell for buses, food and water. >> they're slowly trying to recover. >> reporter: millions of people in 11 states are spending their fourth night in the dark, including seven families in this lower manhattan apartment complex. this couple stranded on the
could hit $50 billion, second only to hurricane katrina. >> dozens of red cross volunteers from the bay area in new york now helping with disaster relief. 50 volunteers on 10 day to three week missions servinging people displaced or without supplies thousands landed in new york providing relief and organization. >> we're working in logistics and immediate yachl we're working in what we call care and shelter and providing high duration and a safe place for people to be. we're looking to support that. >> disney and abc making monday a day of giving for victims of sandy. disney kicking things off with a $2 million donation to the american red cross. ux help by texting to give $10 to the relief efforts. you can donate to the red cross by calling 1-800-help now or by going online to red cross.org/abc. >> economic news, october jobs report is out. candidates using it to try to win over voters before tuesday's election. rates picked up and analysts say that is because more people without jobs started looking for work. 171,000 new jobs were added to the economy. the president seized on the jobs
're certainly there. that's the kind of work that we do. we did it during katrina and rita back in the '05-'06 time frame as you know. our emergency response crews are ready to go. we have teams staged and our emergency response center is staffed here at norwell. you know, we expect over the next, you know, 24-48 hours to be activated and help and deal with any kind of issue that our clients have out there. >> let's talk about your acquisition of safety clean. i have a piece in my hand, august 9, 2012, credit suisse, somewhat negative piece about your company saying it's more cyclical and tied into the oil and gas business than we realize. listen, it's too levered to that cycle. safety clean acquisition changes the whole rationale against owning clean harbors, doesn't it? >> well, i think it does. it's $1.4 billion revenues of environmental service work. it's going to work nicely into our disposal assets. safety clean really is a leader in three areas. the leader in handling small quantities of waste generated by a number of industries out there. over 200,000 different customers out there.
area to get the water out. they are sending in an unwatering team after hurricane katrina in illinois. bringing in pumps from the navy. here is a perfect reason why here at battory park we have the battery tunnel park full of water. it is unbelievable looking at this. some subways will start north of 34th street. 5 and a half million people ride the subway every day here. transportation authority says every day the subway system is closed it costs about $18 million in revenue. 18,000 flights have been grounded. it will take days before it is back to normal. new york's three major airports are expected to be open with limited flights. both from laguardia airport will be starting at 7:00 a.m. 3 occupants or more will have to be in the car to go over the east bridges. it is to help out a huge traffic problem going on around the city. there has been a gas shortage as well as you can image. the drivers literally are running out of gas because they can't fill the reservations they already have. >>> at that time pee ann the new york stock exchange is going to be opening once again today. ye
mcantile exchange when katrina came along and i saw prices explode and that was really tough. could we see something like that again? >> just like everybody has been saying at least all the forecasters, we haven't seen a storm run this pattern this late, this expected path. it will be very interesting to see what plays out. how much damage there is. the storm may come in during high tide. we'll have to see what the implications are. we'll beatching the refineries specifically. melissa: yeah. >> what damage happens. i certaiy don't expect that we'll see the implications we did with hurricane katrina because, quite frankly the east coast is not the refining mecca. it is not the oil producing mea that the gulf was but there certainly could still bempacts nonetheless. melissa: here is what i care about. i'm driving home from work today. should i fillp today? should it get worse over the weekend? should i wait until next week? what is my play here? >> well, you know, playing it before the storm comes would be wise. not necessarily going to be a huge increase in price. in fact if everybody goes
call that had to be made in new orleans after katrina with mardi gras. >> huge debate. the difference was -- the storm in august. mardi gras was in february. months between. now days between. >> i know. >> i don't know. i don't know. a tough call here. it is going to go on. the mayor said it is. those of you coming into the city to do it. run hard. run well. we'll be back with more after this. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now." informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> this morning on "world news now," a presidential promise of help in the heart of the hurricane devastation. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie stood side by side as they toured the destruction and talks with the victims of sandy. it's thursday, november 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good thursday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> always good to have you as the co-pilot here. >> so good to be here. >> there's power here and there's heat which is good. >> yes. both of which i do not have at home. >> soldiering through. welcome b
not to have prepared people properly for this and it becomes another mini katrina situation, it could be literally an election wrecker for the president. conversely, if he handles this very well and it is a huge storm, that can win him the election. it can be politically very important. >> let's be clear. the record is obvious to me, the president has -- we saw what happened in the past in katrina. the president has been very aggressive putting his own boots on the ground. he came through the state of new jersey when we had flooding and the like. so this president to me, he's already proven that point and i know, i know from my work in preparing today, that the federal government is ready for this challenge and they will meet it head-on and deal with the crisis and the aftermath. and i know it's a political issue but i really want to reaffirm to people because the biggest mistakes i've seen often in these storms, especially in the obama administration, has not necessarily been the federal response, it's been from individuals not taking the necessary steps to be ready. and then in the
out. so massive muchs have been brought in used in katrina to train the tunnel. kennedy airport should reopen tomorrow. laguardia is still under water. newark has no power. amtrak could have limited service. for the subways, well, engineers have to walk all 600 miles before the stations begin to slowly reopen. back to you. >> bret: big job. william, thank you. were you or someone you know stranded? let me know on twitter. follow me. @bretbaier. still ahead, if you live in ohio, the politicians will find you. first, while the u.s. still has not interrogate interrogatey suspect known to be in custody in the libya terror attack. years ago, my doctor told me to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? then i heard this news about a multivitamin study looking at long-term health benefits for men over 50. the one they used in that study... centrum silver. that's what i take. my doctor! he knows his stuff. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ]
the florida coast. we got a lot of their grain from katrina. but all of the storms before, we were affected by many of those. we are 100 miles and the coast. you know what i am saying it? i think it is global warming. it could be other things and stuff. but the way the pollution and stuff is affecting the world -- there you can see different changes and stuff. that is what i want to say. host: this also from the wall street journal about transportation. riders took a 5 billion trips and public systems and washington, d.c., philadelphia, boston, jersey and the greater new york city area. scena. go ahead. caller: i am living in new york. and this is an economy issue. i am looking across the street and new jersey is deadlocked. i look downtown and it is blacked out. all of these people cannot go to work today. their businesses are closed. there are people scrambling. my friends are calling and asking where can i get food? this is a big issue. $20 billion is easily going to be the cost of this. it is all about the economy. we can get more than enough energy. and you wouldn't be facing climate c
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 129 (some duplicates have been removed)